Wallet Key Tool (.dat/.key/.aes.json/.txt/.wallet): Private key reader, import and export tool


wallet-key-tool is a handy GUI application for editing the contents of various wallet files (.dat / .key / .aes.json / .txt / .wallet). What wallet-key-tool can do: add or remove keys; reading one format and exporting to another; moving keys between different wallets, etc.

How to use Wallet Key Tool

IMPORTANT! The Wallet Key Tool requires java (v7.0 +) to work.

Through a graphical interface (GUI)

  1. On Windows, you probably just need to double-click the .exe \ .jar file and it will launch (if you have Java installed, the GUI will not work without it).
  2. Whatever open file with Bitcoin wallet: select “load wallet” and select your wallet. then the program will ask for a password (if the wallet / wallet file is encrypted). After entering the password, all public and private keys will be displayed in the main menu of the program.

Through the command line (CLI)

On systems that have a command line interface (this also works on Windows, it’s a little harder to find there, they really hate their own users), you can also start it by running the following command:

java -jar wallet-key-tool.jar

This will open a GUI window that you can interact with, information and error messages will be printed to stderr. If you want to increase the log level, start it like this:

java -Dorg.slf4j.simpleLogger.defaultLogLevel=TRACE -jar wallet-key-tool.jar

Note: the -D option must come before the -jar option, it is passed directly to java. Valid log levels are ERROR, WARN, INFO, DEBUG, TRACE, default is INFO, if you want to see stack traces use TRACE.

If you just want to dump the contents of the wallet to the console without interacting with the GUI, you can pass the filename to it, if you do, it will not try to open the GUI, it will just dump the contents of the wallet. to standard exit and exit. Note that the format of the dump is still subject to change, keep this in mind when writing a parser for it.

java -jar wallet-key-tool.jar <filename>

The program will ask for a password if the file is encrypted. If you want to avoid prompting for a password, you can specify the password using the –password = “my pass phrase” switch (you need quotes if it contains spaces). An example of a session in the console (I didn’t enter the passphrase, I just hit Enter, so no private keys were decrypted):

java -jar build/libs/wallet-key-tool.jar /home/bernd/Schotter/Schotter.wallet
[main] INFO org.multibit.store.MultiBitWalletProtobufSerializer - Loading wallet extension org.multibit.walletProtect.2
Wallet is encrypted. Enter passphrase:
no passphrase entered, will skip decryption
1QKm5sWXuFJ6Zrvqw7NR7gYXyipPSqfv4n KEY DECRYPTION SKIPPED
1DrL3o6ZMAGttc96SPxqTo2yooq52P62kf KEY DECRYPTION SKIPPED
1E79vvzr1KkHXVXNUBwqoW7XDsMYULVqrq KEY DECRYPTION SKIPPED
[...]

MultiBit HD Wallet – Download Bitcoin wallet for Windows/Linux/MacOS


MultiBit was designed to be as easy to use as possible, but Bitcoin itself may require some getting used to. These articles are intended to provide useful explanations of the common problems that people face.

MultiBit HD Designed to be easy to use. It is intended for home users (or small merchants) who want to use a desktop computer for their daily bitcoin operations.

Step 1 – Download and install MultiBit

After downloading the installer, simply double-click the icon and follow the on-screen instructions. In most cases, just accepting the defaults is enough.

Step 2 – Create a Wallet

The first screen you will see is the Welcome Wizard, which will guide you through the creation of the wallet step by step.

Step 3 – Request Bitcoins

Once you have created your wallet, you can unlock it using your password. This will remove the wizard screens to show the main wallet. Selecting the Send / Request link in the sidebar will show two buttons. Click the Request Bitcoins button to open the Bitcoin Request Wizard.

Step 4 – Send Bitcoins

On the “Send / Request” screen, click the “Send Bitcoin” button to open the Bitcoin Sending Wizard.

How to install on Windows / Linux / Mac OS

After downloading the installer, you will see the installation application. The installation is slightly different for users of Windows, Mac and Linux, so select the article below for your operating system:

How to install on Windows

For installation, a standard 64-bit installer is used, which is suitable for Windows 7 and 10 (and some editions of Vista) and higher.

Please note that for security reasons, MultiBit does not support Windows XP and below.

Double-click the installer. Work with the installer – accepting defaults is usually the easiest.

If you have a firewall installed when you first open MultiBit HD, Windows will ask you if you want MultiBit HD to communicate through your Internet connection. MultiBit HD must communicate with the Bitcoin network and the multibit.org server, so allow this access.

How to install on OS X (Mac)

The MultiBit HD installer is slightly different from the standard OS X installer in that it does not depend on a single drag and drop into the application directory. However, as soon as the installer completes the work, the resulting package in applications can be dragged to the launchpad as usual.

How to install on Linux

The Linux installer does not come with a pre-installed Java installation because of the huge variety of Linux distributions available. Therefore, you will need to prepare a suitable JVM for installation before starting the installer. We recommend Open Java 1.7.0_72, however, due to cryptography support issues on some Linux distributions, you may need to use the Oracle JVM instead (see the Troubleshooting section below).

Assuming you have the right JVM installed and you have downloaded the installer to your home directory, follow these steps in the shell:

cd ~
chmod +x multibit-hd-unix-0.x.y.sh
./multibit-hd-unix-0.x.y.sh

After a while, the MultiBit HD will be shown by the wizard and installed in ~ / multibit-hd. Your application directory will be ~ / .multibit-hd and will contain all your configuration and wallet files. It will appear on first launch. A basic Unity .desktop file will be created and registered if available, so you can simply open Unity and search on “MultiBit” to get started (but see later). Alternatively, you can run from the command line as follows (you will see many log messages this way):

cd multibit-hd
./multibit-hd &

After starting the installer, you may need to run several scripts to further integrate MultiBit HD into your environment. In particular, KeepKey support requires certain udev rules. The following sections present these scenarios. If you have a distribution that is not included, and you have a script that you would like to share, let us know via the link to the site at the bottom of the page.